Teaching

Teaching Experience

Teaching Philosophy

As an Afro-Caribbean woman and first generation American, legacies of slavery, colonialism, and poverty have left clear imprints on my family and me. The connections between race, gender, diaspora, and lived experiences became tangible for me as an undergraduate student when I began to internalize how historical events have left palpable impacts on contemporary institutions and marginalized populations. My professors’ abilities to concretize course material not only deepened my knowledge, but also led me to a greater understanding of how to productively engage students in historical inquiry. As a result, I use a constructivist pedagogy that situates students as active participants with a shared responsibility in the learning process.

Three core principles underline my teaching. First, I cultivate students’ abilities to synthesize information about processes of change. Second, I challenge students to articulate evidence-based arguments about their worldviews. Third, I prompt students to recognize the material significance of concepts we explore in class. I structure readings, class discussions, and written assignments such that students synthesize diverse sources, thereby offering multiple entry points into course content. In sum, my pedagogical strategies ensure that new interpretations of race, gender, and systems of oppression are accessible to students as they historicize the processes that facilitate and impede social change.


Teaching Experience

University of Cincinnati

  • Women and Activism. Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department. (Spring 2017)

University of Massachusetts Amherst

  • History of the Civil Rights Movement [Online Course]. W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies. (Winter 2017, Fall 2015)
  • Black Women in the Americas and the Caribbean. W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies. (Spring 2016)
  • Introduction to African American History, 1619-1860. Teaching Assistant. W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies. (Fall 2015)
  • Introduction to African American History, 1860-1954. Teaching Assistant. W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies. (Spring 2015)
  • History of the Civil Rights Movement. Teaching Assistant. W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst. (Fall 2014)

Course Descriptions


Black Women in the Americas and the Caribbean

This course will survey the historical, political, economic and socio-cultural realities that Black women in the Americas and the Caribbean have faced and continue to face. A variety of readings by and about Black women will highlight the ways in which race, class, and gender combine to operate in the lives of Black women. Special attention will be paid to Black women as laborers, Black women as political activists, and the various ways in which Black women in the Americas and the Caribbean experience race and gender.

objectives

  • Analyze the relationships between race, class, gender, and sexuality from the 1700s to the present
  • Consider how race and gender have jointly impacted social, economic, legal, and political systems in the global community
  • Understand the shared experiences and histories of black women through time and space
  • Examine the diversity of black women's lives through time and space

Women and Activism

This course will provide a historical overview of how women have influenced and engaged in various forms of activism, and will provide students a self-directed experiential learning opportunity. Students will evaluate the factors that have contributed to and impeded social change, and will then apply their knowledge by developing community action projects.

objectives

  • Explain how race, class, sexuality, religion, nationality, and other categories of identity have impacted women’s activism
  • Evaluate women activists' approaches to reproductive justice, the carceral state, electoral politics, and environmental justice
  • Identify and articulate the ideologies that have shaped women's activism
  • Apply activist strategies by designing and implementing a community action project

History of the Civil Rights Movement

This course will examine the trajectory of the Civil Rights Movement by focusing on particular events, strategies, organizations, and political actors. After identifying the conditions that contributed to the emergence of the Civil Rights Movement, the course will trace the movement from the landmark 1954 Brown v. Board case to the rise of Black Power during the 1970s. The course will conclude by examining the relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

objectives

  • Explain the significance of various events, campaigns, Supreme Court decisions, executive orders, and legislation during the Civil Rights Movement
  • Identify key actors in the Civil Rights Movement and evaluate the narratives surrounding their activism
  • Differentiate between the ideologies supported by and strategies employed by various organizations, including but not limited to the NAACP, SNCC, the SCLC, CORE, and the BPP
  • Understand the roles that the legislative, executive, and judicial branches played in the Civil Rights Movement
  • Analyze the relationships between race, gender, sexuality, and the Civil Rights Movement
  • Consider the legacy and contemporary implications of the Civil Rights Movement